May 2009

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In honor of the release of BuddyPress 1.0, I trashed my previous installation and created a new one from scratch. The new version of BuddyPress requires WordPressMu 2.7.1 and bbPress 1.0 alpha. The process, while simplified, is still out of the reach of many who are accustomed to the standard, upload, create database, and browser based installation.

It process begins with a standard installation of WPMu. Once that is done, you can install the BuddyPress plugins through the backend: Plugins–>Install New. then activate the plugin. That’s not it though as the web based installer cannot place the BuddyPress themes in the correct directory. To do that, one needs to manually move the themes from the plugin directory to theme directory using ftp or a file manager, then activate the themes.

Integrating bbPress remains the hardest part although it too has been simplified to a 13 step process. You can ignore the warnings about salt this and that failing. Just follow the steps. Unlike my previous experiences trying to integrate bbPress, this all worked the first time through. It involves pasting a line of code into the config and moving a file from BuddyPress into bbpress.

Overall, this is a big step in the right direction. Now that the WPMu framework has been updated, I hope to see more progress with the project. There are a lot a capabilities under the hood that are not yet wired up, much as we saw with the initial release of Elgg. A real concern remains in that bbPress is still alpha. BuddyPress needs a solid stable forum.

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Lawrence Lessig, legal scholar and Creative Commons founder was hit with a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DCMA) take down notice on a recent presentation on copyright law in the digital age. Lessig writes on his blog:

Received a notice that Warner Music had objected to its being posted on copyright grounds. Apparently, YouTube’s content-ID algorithm had found music in the video that they claimed ownership to. The organization is apparently responding by disputing the claim. I’ll report back when I hear more.

Lessig, a Stanford law professor, indicated in a Tweet that he fully intends to take on Warner. It appears that YouTube is taking Lessig’s side on the issue as the disputed portion of the video (Part 2) has been restored to the site.

The video presentation, Getting a Network the World Needs, discussion culter’s shift back to a read/write culture lost in the twentieth century through technology and remix. He worries about the criminalization of our youth by major media companies and offers compromise solutions. His brilliantly crafted presentation appears below.